West Law Report

Fixing Failed States

Posted in Afghanistan Constitution, Authors@Google, International Law, UN by mrkooenglish on June 27, 2008

Jun 2008

(1 hr)

Former U.N. advisers to Afghanistan Ashraf Ghani and Clare Lockhart discusses their latest book, “Fixing Failed States: A Framework for Rebuilding our Fractured World.”
In the talk:

In Fixing Failed States, the authors describe the effort to save failed states–vividly and convincingly–offering an on-the-ground picture of why past efforts have not worked and advancing a groundbreaking new solution to this most pressing of global crises. Military force, while certainly necessary on occasion, cannot solve the fundamental problems, and humanitarian interventions cost billions yet do not leave capable states in their wake. Ghani and Lockhart argue that only an integrated state-building approach can heal these failing countries. As they explain, many of these countries already have the resources they need, if only we knew how to connect them to global knowledge and put them to work in the right way. Their state-building strategy, which assigns responsibility equally among the international community, national leaders, and citizens, maps out a clear path to political and economic stability.

The bio of the speakers:

Ashraf Ghani played a central role in the design and implementation of the post-Taliban settlement in Afghanistan, serving as UN adviser to the Bonn process and as Finance Minister during Afghanistan’s Transitional Administration. He has worked at the World Bank and taught at Johns Hopkins and Berkeley universities. He has been nominated for the job of Secretary General of the United Nations and considered for the job of President of the World Bank. He chairs the Institute for State Effectiveness.

Clare Lockhart is Director for the Institute for State Effectiveness. She has worked for the World Bank, the United Nations and advised the Government of Afghanistan government in Kabul on its strategy and programs from 2002 to 2005. She advises countries and international organizations on state-building and has written widely on the topic.

http://www.effectivestates.org

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The Race Card

Posted in Authors@Google, racial discrimination by mrkooenglish on May 17, 2008

Authors@Google
Apr 2008

(58 min)

Richard Thompson Ford, the professor of law at Stanford University, talks about his book, The Race Card: How Bluffing About Bias Makes Race Relations Worse.

Ford, argues that ubiquitous accusations of discrimination in the United States frequently distract from serious racial injustices, which, in the ambivalent aftermath of the civil-rights era, “stem from isolation, poverty, and lack of socialization as much as from intentional discrimination or racism.” Drawing on examples from popular culture and the law, Ford guides readers through the worst of these abuses, and articulates a bold strategy for dealing with systematic injustice in a world of “racism without racists.”

The Future of Reputation

Posted in Authors@Google, copyright, Defamation, Law and information, online privacy by mrkooenglish on May 7, 2008

Authors@Google: Daniel Solove
Feb 2008

(53 min)

Daniel J. Solove, an associate professor of law at the George Washington University Law School discusses his book “The Future of Reputation“:

What information about you is available on the Internet? What if it’s wrong, humiliating, or true but regrettable? Will it ever go away? Teeming with chatrooms, online discussion groups, and blogs, the Internet offers previously unimagined opportunities for personal expression and communication. But there’s a dark side to the story. A trail of information fragments about us is forever preserved on the Internet, instantly available in a Google search. A permanent chronicle of our private lives—often of dubious reliability and sometimes totally false—will follow us wherever we go, accessible to friends, strangers, dates, employers, neighbors, relatives, and anyone else who cares to look. This engrossing book, brimming with amazing examples of gossip, slander, and rumor on the Internet, explores the profound implications of the online collision between free speech and privacy.

Daniel Solove, an authority on information privacy law, offers a fascinating account of how the Internet is transforming gossip, the way we shame others, and our ability to protect our own reputations. Focusing on blogs, Internet communities, cyber mobs, and other current trends, he shows that, ironically, the unconstrained flow of information on the Internet may impede opportunities for self-development and freedom. Longstanding notions of privacy need review, the author contends: unless we establish a balance among privacy, free speech, and anonymity, we may discover that the freedom of the Internet makes us less free.